Forest and Climate | WWF

Forest and Climate



What is REDD?

 As part of its natural functions, the forest captures carbon and other gases produced by human activities which, if the forests didn’t, would go to the atmosphere contributing to the greenhouse effect and consequently to the global warming. WWF Peru works with authorities and local partners setting grounds for the future implementation of a mechanism that would let preserve the forest from its financial assessment role as a weather regulator, known as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD).
 
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Forest and Climate
© WWF Perú

The amazing Amazon

 With over 6, 7 million km2, the Amazon covers an area twice the size of India. Here, the world greatest river system nourishes the largest and most diverse tropical forest on the planet.
The Amazon is home to 1 in every 10 terrestial species in the world, including thousand of plants and animals which do not exist anywhere else.
More than 350 ethnic groups depend on the resources the forest provides.
Besides its enormous natural and cultural value, the Amazon reinforest is an important regulator of the world's climate since it stores gases such as carbon dioxide, preventing their concentration on the atmosphere and thus reducing the greenhouse effect, and the increase in temperature.
 
© WWF Perú
REDD+
© WWF Perú
 
© WWF Perú
Climate Witnesses
© WWF Perú

Forests and Climate Change

 When we loose our forests, regional termperature increases rapidly. And even worse, due to the release of CO2, deforestation also greatly contributes to global warming.

On the other hand, preserving our forests helps to stabilize the planet's warming. Perú is one of the most vulnerable countries to yhe effects of climate change, and now we know that the loss of our forests is responsible for almost 50% of greenhouse gas emissions in our country.

Preserving our Amazon reinforests helps us ensure a stable climate, a safe planeta; and the livelihood of millions of people. But how can we do this? In Madre de Dios, some promising experiences show us the way forward...
 
© WWF/ Oliver Phillips
Burning forest, Peru
© WWF/ Oliver Phillips

WWF and Carbon Forest

 
© WWF / ANDRE BARTSCHI
Carbon Forest
© WWF / ANDRE BARTSCHI
 As part of its natural functions, the forest sequesters carbon and other gases produced by human activities that otherwise, would go towards the atmosphere, thus contributing towards the greenhouse effect and consequently with global warming. WWF Peru works alongside authorities and local partners, laying the foundations for the future implementation of a mechanism that will allow the conservation of the forest starting from the economic value of its role as a climate regulator, known as Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD).

To implement an unprecedented conservation mechanism such as REDD, there is a need for clear technical arguments and solid tools. For this reason, since 2008 – and through local partners - WWF Peru combines field research with institutional strengthening actions.

This way, it works in key areas such as San Martin and Madre de Dios - either carrying out extensive field studies or using modern remote sensing systems - to determine the carbon sequestration potential of the forests and obtain the necessary arguments to support their conservation.

At the same time, it has fostered the establishment of the REDD Roundtable, an important arena to create strategies – made up of 50 institutions – that has identified the technical, legal and financial requirements to implement this conservation mechanism in Peru. Recently WWF Peru has contributed with the analysis of the political and legal framework required to implement REDD and, continues promoting this mechanism as a feasible option for the conservation of Peruvian forests.